Posts Tagged ‘casey anthony defamation update’

The federal judge overseeing Casey Anthony’s bankruptcy will decide whether Zenaida Gonzalez’s civil defamation lawsuit will be thrown out within 30 days.  Attorneys for Gonzalez claim her life was ruined after Anthony claimed a similarly named nanny abducted her daughter in 2008.  Anthony was acquitted of her daughter’s murder in 2011.  Anthony’s attorneys say that the lawsuit is frivolous and only serves to “bolster the name of Morgan and Morgan…”  Morgan and Morgan law firm is representing Gonzalez.

Anthony’s attorneys have filed a summary judgment request.

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Judge Belvin Perry, who presided over Casey Anthony’s murder trial, might not be moving from the courtroom to television like he originally wanted, but his fame won’t go to waste.  Just days after officially resigning as chief judge of the Ninth Judicial Circuit in Florida, the 25-year veteran will be headed to Morgan and Morgan Law Firm.

Perry, 64, became one of the most prominent legal names as he presided over the 2011 sensationalized trial, where Anthony was acquitted of all serious charges.  Perry says he looks forward to being back in the courtroom working on cases.  Before becoming a judge, Perry spent several years as a prosecutor.  His most prominent case being that of the “Black Widow” Judy Buenoano, whom he put on death row.

The Morgan and Morgan Law Firm is handling Zenaida Gonzalez’s defamation case against Casey Anthony.

Tampa bankruptcy judge K. Rodney May ruled Tuesday that Casey Anthony must answer some of the questions she did not answer during a recent deposition.  The deposition was taken in January as part of the Zenaida Gonzalez defamation lawsuit still pending.

Casey Anthony accused a woman of kidnapping her daughter in 2008, that woman had a similar name to Zenaida Gonzalez.  Gonzalez’s attorneys wanted the judge to order Anthony to answer questions ranging from the alleged defamation to Caylee’s disappearance and death, as well as where Caylee was when Anthony lied to investigators and during a July 25th videotaped jail visit that backbones the Gonzalez lawsuit.  In that visitation video, Casey Anthony tells her parents that she never saw a picture of “that girl down in Kissimmee”, who deputies questioned.

The judge said no questions regarding Caylee can be asked.

Shuker told the media afterwards, “What I’m hoping is that the judge is saying, you can get there without asking her directly…”

The judge ruled that Anthony’s state of mind is important and she must answer questions about that.

Cheney Mason told Fox35, that overall they were pleased, “it’s clear that the judge has an intelligent view of what this case is and what this case is not.”

Casey Anthony’s lawyers argued to the judge that she should be allowed to plead the Fifth and not answer questions about Caylee because of possible federal perjury charges.  They argued to the judge that it was possible that Gonzalez’s lawyers were attempting to trap Anthony on purpose.  Judge May said he will not let Gonzalez’s lawyers retry the state’s failed case against Anthony.

During the deposition, Anthony admitted to lying about Zenaida Fernandez Gonzalez kidnapping her daughter, but denied ever implicating Zenaida Gonzalez, and in fact pointed out that she cleared her to the police.

The judge’s ruling means that Gonzalez’s lawyers can ask Casey Anthony why she never publicly cleared Gonzalez, after telling her parents that she never saw a picture of that “girl down in Kissimmee.”  The attorneys will also apparently be allowed to ask why Casey Anthony invented the kidnapping story about Zenaida Fernandez Gonzalez.

“We’re not thrilled with the ruling…we’re looking forward to asking questions we’re allowed to ask,” Gonzalez’s attorney Scott Shuker told WESH 2, “But disappointed we can’t ask about Caylee’s whereabouts.”

Gonzalez’s attorneys need to establish that Anthony maliciously and intentionally defamed Gonzalez in July of 2008.  If they do not established this, the lawsuit will not survive.  The new deposition was not scheduled.  The judge said that he would like to be available by phone at the next deposition to make decisions about what must be answered.

Anthony was found not guilty of murdering her daughter, but convicted of two counts of lying to law enforcement officers in a 2011 capital trial.